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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
and mitt romney. test. >> barack obama didn't perform that well until late and romney didn't perform the campaign well. campaign management is more important than an individual candidate's performance. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 2012 with two takes on history, first, a look at the emancipation proclamation on the eve of the 150th anniversary of president lincoln's action to end slavery and the civil war. >> woodruff: plus michael beschloss and richard norton smith talk about potential historical turning points of the past year. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 2
. >> who have been vetted? >> romney, paw lenty and trying to vet bloomberg. >> none of them. >> obama changed the entire dynamic. it is a changed year, sir. we desperately need a game changing pick. none of these middle aged white guys are game changers. >> ed harris is just remarkable. john mccain didn't always come across so well in the book. times when he was fumbling through papers, going with bernanke and paulson about the melt down that seems every bit as disconnected. this movie he comes across as 100% grade a all american hero. why did he make that decision? >> i admire john mccain and admire especially early john mccain and was a fan for years and i think he found himself in a very tough pickle in the beginning of this story. obama was surging in the polls. it was all kind of going to a very tough place when he had to make the decision. i felt i want the audience to be in his shoes and look at the dilemma he faced. especially when people say you can take this risky choice or you can lose. i want people to relate with them at that moment. casting ed harris is part of it. i thi
bet. dagen: what went wrong with the romney campaign? you will not believe what his son has to say about his father's reluctance to even run for president in the first place. dennis: plus, a dentist fires an assistant for being too attractive. the iowa supreme court rules it legal. will this spread? dagen: on this final shopping day before christmas, it's been a rough one this holiday season, stores don't seem that busy. dagen: merry christmas and it is all about stocks now and every 15 minutes even on christmas eve. nicole, stocks still in the red. nicole: that's right. we're seeing the dow right now at 13,142. that's a loss of about 1/3 of 1%. much like the s&p 500 and the tech heavy nasdaq composite, all three are pulling back a little bit, when you speak of the broader markets, though, when you look at the dow, we have been up four of the last five trading weeks. the trend has been to the upside. but still concerns now from washington about washington, about the fiscal cliff, traders of course don't think anything is getting settled today. they are even talking about the fact t
or self deport. >> self deportation by undocumented workers was not by itself responsible for romney's dismal showing among hispanics, but certainly greased the skids. for which romney would have liked to have had aa mulligan, there was this. >> 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. there are 47% who are with him, who are dependent upon him, who believe that they are a victim. >> reporter: romney called his remarks completely wrong. they also caused the deepest self inflicted wound of the election. on the flip side -- >> he will be the next vice president of the united states. >> romney's vp day may well have been the best moment of his campaign, the selection of congressman paul ryan excited conservatives in a way romney himself had not. how many moments are there in an hour and a half? the president lost all of them in the first debate. pictures tell the story of a man who phoned it in, panicking his supporters and providing an opening for romney. and, finally, the top three moments of the election best described aas history-making politics. a supreme co
?wo mom or dad or mitt romney or al gore. i mean, it's a a historicalr alm description if you look at what happened over the last century.i they stopped working when theyat had small children. y got marrie stopped working when they had small children and all these professions women when do which were considered men's professions. women have broken through every one of those barriers where men move a lot more slowly in what is acceptable for them to do. 1-woman who is a critic of mine agrees with this point and calls it the masculine mystique. what she is referring to in 1962, feminine mystique, we had this idea we had unnecessarily restricted women and they were allowed to do a few things to be considered feminine and maybe now doing a similar thing to men. we have restricted what is okay for men to do and be considered masculine and sweeney to expand at a little bit. initially i started thinking about this as an economic argument. in the year-and-a-half or two i have been interested in the cultural implications. or young people, young people in different parts of america working-class cou
food b ban. david: take a look at this quote about romney. quote he wanted to be president less than anyone i've met in my life. he had no desire to run. now that is from his son, tagg romney about his father. he said that governor romney had to be persuaded to run by his wife and tagg. so company, what do you think about this? do you believe it? adam: if tagg wants back in on the inheritance -- [laughter] shibani: what do you think? if that's the case, then everything worked out as it should have in the first place. well, i would beg that his son is probably not the best spokesman. david: i mean i don't think somebody runs for six years straight without wanting the job. adam: of course romney wanted to be president. david: we don't believe you tagg, sorry. well stuart may be out for christmas, but here's something that can get us all into the holiday spirit. take a listen. stuart: two of my beautiful granddaughters will be with us this christmas, abigail and paige are watching right now. this is for you. 'twas the night before christmas when all through the house not a creature was
and murdoch pretty much shut that door in a couple of sentences. two words from mitt romney during the primary reverberated all the way through to november. the issue was his plan to prevent employers from hiring undocumented workers. >> people who have come here illegally won't be able to find work and over time those people would tend to leave the country or self-deport. >> reporter: the concept of self-deportation was not by itself responsible for romney's dismal showing among hispanics, but it surely greased the skids. also in the category of moments for which romney would like to have had a mulligan, there was this. >> there are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. there are 47% who are with him, who are dependent upon government, who believe they're victims. >> reporter: romney called his remarks completely wrong. they also caused the deepest self-inflicted wound of the election. on the flipside -- >> he's going to be the next vice president of the united states. >> reporter: romney's vp day may well have been the best moment of his campaign. the selection of
again. if we are not growing, then the people in charge aren't doing their jobs. mitt romney made his argument in an explicit part of his campaign. >> economic growth this year slower than last year and last year slower than the year before. going with the status quo is not going to cut it for the people who are struggling today. >> that presupposes that growth and faster growth is a good thing. since the dawn of modern capital lich ism, be they have pondered whether it's even desirable. prominent voices are revisiting those debates asking, is growth necessarily good and is a happy sustainable future with broadly and equitably distributed profitable? joining us to answer those questions is christian pa are renti, contributing editor to "the nation" and chrystia freeland, author of "plutocrat." >> partly because women aren't having so many kids anymore. i mean, pretty soon we're going to be talking about, you know, demographic winter. >> we're talking about that now. >> and one of the things that was assumed, when you're thinking about growth in the future, is assuming what will contin
he wants to do and romney says he wants to do when we got -- when we have a trillion dollar deficit. >> just a few days before the election day and your analysis of the polls have given the president better than 80% chance of winning re-election? >> the fact that the president leads in the polls in ohio and iowa states where you would need -- he would need to win 207 electoral votes means he's the favorite in the electoral college. >> this is the era of reflation. bernanke is writing checks, maria. >> writing checks from the -- >> my friend steve jobs has lots of cash in the bank. >> you started brewing sam adams beer in your kitchen in 1984. tell me how that happened, how -- how did you decide you wanted to brew your own beer in the kitchen? >> well, i come from six generations of brewmasters, so beer was kind of in my history, in my blood. about .06, that was still legal. >> homeless to a millionaire? >> we believed what we did would work, no matter how bad times were. >> in 2020, are we going to be in a much better place? the alternative was not the greatest health care system in
romney the other night without a speech. so i want to say first that it's such an honor to have been able to be in the same room last night with the finalist who don't need to tell them what extraordinary company they are. this book was done as a labor of love for my husband, who brought me in as a writer, brought me into a rope that i didn't know and made me believe that the stories there could be told. but the work itself was the product of some extraordinary women. it was who believed in me in this book and gave of their time to do it and that is kate medina and london king and all of these ferocious women at random house. i am grateful to them. [applause] i also have to say that this book would not be possible without two other extraordinary women. they are my translators for this project and they risked more than i did to tell the stories. finally, i'm grateful to the courage of the people who allow their stories to be told. if this means anything, i think it's this. that small stories in so-called places matter and one of the reasons that they matter i think is because, because they
this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. so if you went out and you asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obamacare? most would say no, but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm still going to try to make them better and a guy he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of middle class americans and in the end, people decided to stick with the devil they knew rather than the one they didn't. >> paul: so the election, the republican defeat was big, but it wasn't overwhelming in a sense of repudiation, kim, as far as a republican platform and their agenda? >> no, i think the reason, look, this country had the opportunity in this election to once again hand completely controlled government to democrats. everyone in the house was up for reelection and yet, they continued to give republicans, majority there. they liked divided government and i thi
and not just between him and bent romney but a choice between the ideology and different approaches to government and different sets of divisions and values and everything he did in that timeframe he kept trying to tethered to this big idea and when i wrote to the book of course we didn't know how things would end up on november 6, 2012, but i looked at how she developed the governing strategy, and they're really culminated in november, so this is the back story to what happened in this presidential campaign. >> david korn, showdown is the most recent book and we are here at the national press club. >>> robert discusses the role that geography has played in shaping the defense and talks about the role that it plays in the future. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the s
? >> it has. you know, certainly the equities were discounting a romney victory back in november. got hit pretty hard afterwards. now the stocks are back to where it was prior to the election. in my view, there's not much more major harm that the epa and other regulation can do to the coal industry. but certainly as the economy dictates demand, electricity generation and more confidence, that will be more important than say the epa. the epa has done their damage for the most part. you can never say never but i think most of the negative news is behind coal for the epa. ashley: what companies do you like in particular? >> we talked about the thermal coal for electricity generation and metallurgical coal for steel. on the latter we look at alpha natural resources which is the largest exporter of metallurgical coal out of the united states, mass the most export capacity. on the thermal side the two names to be looking at -- ashley: you like these prices? >> yeah, they have come down quite a bit and we do anticipate a recovery in pricing over the next 12, 18 months for the commodities. and on
youtube video of all-time. number seven, republican presidential candidate mitt romney. >> this election is over, but our principles endure. >> romney ran on his impressive business credentials, but it was his multiple gaffes during the campaign that analysts say helped to seal his feat. remember the 47% comments. >> the 47% are dependent on it. >> and this one. >> binders full of women. >> number six, ex-cia director general david petraeus. >> we have breaking news now coming in regarding the chief of the cia. general david petraeus. >> general petraeus, can you talk with us please? >> the news was unexpected. the reason shocking. petraeus, a retired four-star general had quit his cia post and admitted he had cheated on his wife. petraeus's mistress was also his biographer, paula broadwell. an embarrassing exit from the stage. >> impressive list. that is just half of them. the most intreiguing people of 2012. the top five are revealed after the break. bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint driv
institute. he was the author of much of mitt romney's economic policies. a good friend of the show. jean, let me start with you. tax increases on people making more than 250,000 a year. let's use that as a number. it might be 400,000, it might be half a million. it might be a million. let's take $250,000. if you increase taxes, the marge nalt tax rate from 35% to 39.6% on that group of people, does it hurt the economy? >> i'm going to use estimates from the congressional budget office. a nonpartisan score keeper for congress. they found if you let the bush tax cuts on higher earners, it would boost the economy almost as much as if you let everybody's bush tax cuts stay in place. there's little difference on how much would you help the economy if you let the bush tax cuts stay in place for everyone or for most people. in that sense it sounds like it wouldn't have a huge effect on the economic recovery. having said that i think if you asked most economists and tax experts, all things being equal is it better to have lower rates or higher rates, they would say probably better to have lower
theory that he could make the 2012 race a choice not just between him and mitt romney, but a choice between different ideologies, different approaches to government, between different sets of visions and values. and everything he did in that time frame he kept trying to tether to this big idea he had about a choice. and when i wrote the book, of course, we didn't know how things would end up on november 6, 2012, but, um, i looked at how he developed his governing strategy and his electoral strategy, and it really culminated in november. so this is the back story to what happened in this presidential campaign. >> david corn, "showdown" is his most recent book. we're here at the national press club. >> david nassau recounts the life of joseph p. kennedy, patriarch of the political family that included president john f. kennedy and senators robert kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's career in business and politics which included ventures in wall street, hollywood and founding chairman of the securities and exchange commission. this is a little under an hour
washington times." if you have not heard of this peace we found in the times as well. they say mitt romney's oldest son said his dad never wanted a job. postmortem on the mitt romney campaign. it reports-- john on the democratic line. what is your level of optimism? caller: i am just wondering if we are going to have a new cabinet next year. host: would do you think? caller: we might. maybe things would change. host: any names in mind? caller: no names, just a new cabinet. host: we have another job on the line from massachusetts. caller: i am a disabled american. i have paid into social security system and medicare for 40 years, which it was about 2100 paychecks and a money from my ssdi and medicare was taken out of my disability checks and medicare was not free. if it was not a handout. i bought it. i am one of millions of disabled americans to do that need their disability checks and health care must around with by president obama, harry reid, and john boehner. host: here is a twitter message. a lead story in "the washington post." janesville, wisconsin, independent. good morning. what i
to who these two men are and have no idea what mitt romney's plan for the country was -- you know, a billion citizens united is a disaster, and i talked to jim messina, who was so instrumental in the obama re-election organization. he feels as though -- i hope i am not speaking out of school to say this -- he feels we need a constitutional amendment to protect voters rights and to also protect our collections from the pollution of this amazing amount of money. i agree with bonnie. i do not know if it is an option, but the money is a distraction. it does not to give us good information about who these people are. now, noam chomsky says that the size of a piece of information is to make it as short as it is today is an effective way of censoring, is a censorship to shorten our pieces of information, because it gives us the opportunity to say something that people already know. but the amount of time that it takes to contradict a sort of known perceived consensus of reality and perceived wisdom to disassembled that in to build into someone's mind in an argument an alternative way of
i got you this. this is a mitt romney chia pet. >> wow. mitt romney chia pet. >> and you got you a barack obama chia pet. in a couple of weeks, those things will be in full bloom. >> on ebay you can get one of those. i thought becky was going to be here. i got becky, because she's kind of a jersey girl. i got this for all my guys in the company. the guy who runs my d.c. office, dan clifton. this is fiscal clifton world tour. and all the places where he was, various and sundry places -- >> who is that band? >> this is k.i.s.s. and my partner -- >> we've got to go. jason, thank you for all of this. we appreciate it very much. join us on wednesday. happy holidays. "squawk on the street" starts right now. >> can't wait to see what jason got us here. welcome to "squawk on the street" on this final trading day before christmas. i'm carl, with melissa lee, david faber at the nyse. the new york stock exchange and nasdaq closing at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. the futures, a little bit of weakness here which we'll talk about in a minute, after it comes after a pretty bad day on friday. the eur
debate in the subsequent again romney versus obama? >> i don't think science ever plays a larger role and for me that is unfortunate. dividing that al gore would have been a better president? no. someone who routinely exaggerate some of science offends me as a scientist because that isn't what scientists are supposed to be. it can be a truth regularly took information and what we would stretch it to the point of lowercase its still scientifically somewhat accurate who and it's really stretching it here and he did that over and over and over again. his 25 rise in the sea level is assuming the dreamland ice sheet melts and no one knows if that is going to happen or not there's a lot of melting the summer, you know the arctic didn't have much ice at all so this is a problem but it isn't useful to exaggerate which is what he regular leaded and when you are caught exaggerating the problem use the credibility and the science loses credibility, so no i don't think al gore would have been a letter spokesman because i don't think he did a good job at all in the field. >> i actually was here in
toss. do we like mr. romney, mr. obama, prefer the republicans and the democrats. for the mass of people sent the system cannot be debated because everyone agrees, then we focus elsewhere on things like whether you can have a gun in the back of your truck or whether you can approve of being marriage or a whole host of other issues whose importance on not disputing, but are issues that get us away from this thorny problem of how the economics and politics are articulated where they're is a desire of those who run the society that that simply be ruled out of order. >> the corporations that dominate what most people in this country see here, perfecting the art of propaganda and manufacturing consent well simultaneously criminalizing dissent. i want you to talk about the very origins of this which could be traced to the much revered and in my view much overrated founding fathers, the political rally. people talk about them in hushed tones. let's hear what they have to say about these kinds of issues. james madison who wrote with hamilton the federalist papers, principal writing of
close attention to who these two men are and have no idea what mitt romney's plan for the country was -- you know, a billion dollars spent on advertising, citizens united is a disaster, and i talked to jim messina, who was so instrumental in the obama re-election organization. he feels as though -- i hope i am not speaking out of school to say this -- he feels we need a constitutional amendment to protect voters rights and to also protect our collections -- elections from the pollution of this amazing amount of money. i agree with bonnie. i do not know if it is an auction, but the money is a distraction. it does not to give us good information about who these people are. now, noam chomsky says that the size of a piece of information is to make it as short as it is today is an effective way of censoring, is a censorship to shorten our pieces of information, because it gives us the opportunity to say something that people already know. but the amount of time that it takes to contradict a sort of known perceived consensus of reality and perceived wisdom to disassemble that and to bui
over the weekend that you brought us that i was going do -- oh,no. did you see mitt romney did not want to run? >> i saw that. that was in the boston globe. that was a great piece worth reading. then he found out how bad things were going on his ipad. >> yeah. but maybe he didn't want to run because there were times i really kind of thought it looked like he didn't want to run. >> yeah, but towards the end, i thought he did. >> he tried hard. thanks. >> okay. >> come over here. >>> in other news, a dock worker strike on the atlantic and coast could be just days away. port operators have been negotiating with the long shoreman association since march. but the two sides are said to be far from closing on a deal that would cover cargo handling at 15 ports, a 9d 0-day extension to an employment contract. the union has said 15,000 long shoremen could strike a day later. rick scott sent a letter to president obama asking him to invoke federal law in order to invoke a cooling off period. i don't know what the likelihood of that is. i don't know what the president might do. do you think he woul
cuts during the campaign, mitt romney and paul ryan and all the republicans, who wanted to do the exact same thing he did, they jumped on his case for proposing cuts to medicare. so how can you negotiate with a party that isn't serious about its own caucus, and isn't capable of controlling them and doesn't have a serious plan for dealing with spending cuts on its own, because it's afraid to take the heat? nobody wants to cut spending. let's just admit that. but if we're going to do it, somebody's got to take the heat and the republicans have been the party advocating it for so long, so take the heat republicans and tell us exactly what you're going to do. are you going to cut mortgage interest deductions, charitable deductions, federal and state tax deductions? let us know where you're going to do to pay for this debt reduction that you want. >> the fact of the matter is, it's not going to get done with just spending cuts or increased taxes, it's going to have to be a combination of both, and right now the worst part of it is, and i think where we see the instability, especially when it
white house aide. he was also a romney surrogate. jimmy, do you know how much msnbc pays versus cnbc? i mean is there a reason that you feel more aligned with -- what do we got to do to get you here, anyway? >> pay me more, baby. it's called capitalism. >> oh. now -- >> the democrat speaking. >> now you like capitalism, when it applies to you. okay. we got it. jimmy, can they do anything to -- between tonight -- or they can meet with the president today, and then the house gets back on sunday. do you think they can do some stripped down bill? >> i think that -- i know they can. but they won't. and the reason they won't is because speaker boehner, who i like and you and i have talked about, cannot get -- listen, if he can't get a million bucks threshold on a tax cut through his chamber, what's he going to do get $500,000? it's not going to happen. what i think is going to happen at the white house this afternoon, though, is these folks are going to come in, sit down with the president, they're going to say, okay, we're all jumping over the cliff. so what do we do after the cliff? and tha
in medicare savings on the table. the majority of americans, including romney voters understand the obvious, that is revenues have to be part of the equation. this is a question -- why can't we do it is the head scratching question for most people. it's really part of the institution institutional paralysis of congress, you have a filibuster that enables the minority to work their will and stop even consideration of legislation. in the house, the speaker has to bite the bullet and put on the floor a bill that's going to get significant democratic support and some republican support. that's the only way to do what the country needs. >> and still keep his speakership is the trick. >> i think he can. i think the republicans voting no just don't want their fingerprints on this. if boehner puts something on the floor that passes and they can vote against it, they will underspeaker boehner w was -- speaker boehner was doing the dirty work they were unable to do. >> i know you aren't watching the markets closely. would it alter the calculus at all? does it mean we get a framework in 24 hours if we
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)